Outlook Issue 25 Spring 2018
News and Views from St. Mary's Woodbridge
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Help for people like Marcelin
Marcelin's story is a typically sad one, one of too many from around the world. Marcelin lives in Haiti and when Hurricane Matthew struck he lost his home, his livestock and his possessions. He is fighting hard to care for his two teenage daughters. Could you help to provide a new secure home for them? At the moment they live in an old concrete shower block with no windows or doors. Their only furniture is a single bed the girls sleep on. Marcelin fears that his daughter’s hunger could lead them to be exploited by predatory men in exchange for food. He tries to grow crops, but Haitian weather makes that very hit-or-miss. Christian Aid tries to help people like Marcelin, facilitating the building of hurricane-proof dwellings and providing a goat to help him towards self-sufficiency. Woodbridge and Melton Churches Together do their best to organise house-to-house collections during Christian Aid Week which is 13-19 May this year. We aim to put an envelope through every letterbox in Woodbridge and Melton, inviting you to donate, and returning to collect later in the week. The aid is directed towards needy people of any religion or none. You can help by putting a donation, however small, in your envelope. Every little helps! If you would like to help collecting, you can ring me on 01394 386786. If there is no reply, please leave a message on my answerphone with your name and contact number. Many thanks. Tony Waller Woodbridge Tree for Peace 2017 Woodbridge has a new monument. It’s a simple tree on Kingston Field, chosen by the town’s Quakers to represent peace. A seat nearby names it as The Woodbridge Tree for Peace 2017 – Inspired by the Quaker Peace Testimony. It has been warmly welcomed by other residents, who see in the tree’s natural tranquillity, strength and beauty a wonderful symbol of peace. Quakers intend the Tree for Peace to be used in a variety of ways to support community activities ‘for peace’. Individuals might rest there to enjoy or reflect on peace. Groups might meet near the tree to commemorate events around the world that have shaped peace and peace-making. At times of heightened concern we might gather there in unity to express compassion for victims. During 2018, there is to be a formal inauguration event. Michael Madden, Woodbridge Quakers